Why I Quit My Day Job.

Posted by Norma Spathonis on
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the-mask

Did I ever tell you guys about my day job? Yeah you guys may have wondered why you have not being hearing as much from me on these blog posts in days of late. Well, the reason for that is that I picked up a job working as a consultant for Musician Blend. Ever heard of these guys? I practically grew up with their music catalogue, I took it everywhere I went, and I never would have survived High School study hall without it. Those old catalogues were awesome, especially 15 or 20 years ago, before Amazon and other big online business for music buyers. Well, anyway I picked up what I thought would be an awesome day job. I soon figured out though it had some definite drawbacks.

After three weeks of training staring at washed up guitar tech nerds talking about all the technical aspects of perfect tone and fret oil technique I was so thoroughly bored I really could have cried. The only thing that saved me was the product room. This little piece of musician paradise had all of the top of the line equipment you could think of or have ever dreamed about; all there in one nice little compact and sound proofed room. And what is more, amazingly, we were allowed to use them. All instruments, gear, equipment, all of it was there free of charge for us to play to our hearts content. I truly was like a kid in a candy store.

Every single fifteen minute break and sometimes even during my lunch hour (seriously, the whole hour), I would head for that room and jam. I’m getting a little bit older, in my mid thirties, but I still jam like I did when I was a kid. It was fun, and because almost everyone there played music it was interesting to wait and see who would pop in the door to give it a shot. All kinds of people and personalities kicking out the jams at will. One day me and two other guys were really rocking out the house. I was on piano doing some improve when one of the managers popped in and started backing me up with a grooving drum beat and then this young guy (he was maybe only 20) came in and hopped on the bass and immediately supplied us with this jumpy bass riff. It was really cool. That aspect I liked. I got so lost in these random jam sessions I was late half the time when I was due to return back to the mind numbing boredom of the Musician Blend technical lecture series. You see, my time in that training room and then the time in the practice room served to remind me of something that maybe I forgot about myself. I am not so much a technical person as I am a creative person. I can’t stand to debate the properties and benefits of a particular brand of guitar strings, but if you want to talk a out writing a song I am all ears.

Well, as this realization dawned on me I started to resent being force fed all this technical babble that was supposedly useful for my job as a consultant and started to rethink my little side job with Musician Blend. This alone was already putting on the road to leaving the company, I was well on that path, and then came our first day on the phone. You see as a Musician Blend consultant I was being trained to take phone calls to answer other musician’s questions about super technical aspects of their instruments.

When the first call came through I couldn’t believe who it was, it was my son! Just a bizarre random coincidence but it was so odd. We had just bought him his drum set a year before, and he had been going through drum sticks and drum heads like mad. He was actually calling to get some advice on what the best combination of sticks and heads would make for the most durable. Smart little guy, even at ten he is becoming independent enough to find stuff out on his own like that.

(See his first time on the drums here!)

Well I of course I knew it was my son right away, but I tried to pretend I didn’t until he found me out. I had him until he mentioned he had just broke a new set of drum heads and asked why his new sticks would do that. I blurted out, “What?! I just bought you those!” With my friendly consultant mask falling off my voice, and a familiar annoyed father tone coming forth, my son realized quick. He said, “Dad??” “Is that you?” “What are you doing there??” After that, I just half mumbled into the phone, “Hell if I know…” and hung it up and walked out of the building. It was like my son brought me back to reality. I don’t need to be a consultant for anyone but my family and my own music. So long Musician Blend.